Westchester Gastroenterology Associates, P.C.

LOWER ENDOSCOPY - PATIENT INFORMATION
(COLONOSCOPY)

After careful medical assessment your doctor has recommended that you have colonoscopy (koh-lunNAH-skuh-pee). Colonoscopy allows the physician to look inside your entire large intestine, from the lowest part, the rectum and the large intestine (colon) and to identify any abnormalities such as inflamed tissue, abnormal growths, ulcers, bleeding and muscle spasms.

You will be asked to sign a consent form authorizing the doctor to perform the procedure.

Please inform the doctor and the GI nurse if you are allergic to any medications. It is very helpful to bring a list of your medications including any over the counter drugs you take daily.

An intravenous line (IV) will be started for the purpose of giving medication that will make you sleepy and relaxed for the procedure.

For the procedure you will lie on your left side on the examining table or stretcher including any over the counter drugs you take daily.

An intravenous line (IV) will be started for the purpose of giving medication that will make you sleepy and relaxed for the procedure.

For the procedure you will lie on your left side on the examining table or stretcher. You will be given conscious IV sedation (pain medication and a mild sedative) to keep you comfortable and relaxed during the exam. The physician will insert a long, flexible, lighted tube into your rectum and slowly guide it through your colon.

The tube is called a colonoscope (ko-LON-oh-skope). The scope transmits the image of the inside of the colon, so the physician can move it around the curves of your colon. You may be asked to change position occasionally to help the physician move the scope. The scope also blows air into your colon, which inflates the colon and helps the physician see better. You may feel bloating or cramps due to the air that is put into the colon.

Often a biopsy specimen (tiny piece of tissue) is taken for microscopic examination. If you have a polyp (a growth sometimes found in the colon), it may be removed by electrocautery technique, this is all performed through the colonoscope. You will not feel any sensation or discomfort when the biopsy is performed or the polyp is removed.

Bleeding or perforation of the colon are possible complications of colonoscopy. These complications should be discussed with your physician. However, such complications are very uncommon.

The procedure usually takes 20 to 60 minutes. Many people do not recall any of the procedure because of the effect of the medication. After the procedure, you will probably feel drowsy and may sleep for a short time. You may feel some bloating from the air inserted during the procedure. You will feel more comfortable if you expel this air.

Before you leave the doctor will discuss the finding (if any) with you. The GI nurse will give you written instructions to follow when you get home. Also, you MUST arrange for someone to take you home afterward - you will not be allowed to drive or leave on your own via taxi or bus because of the sedatives.

Preparation:

Your doctor will give you specific instructions that will tell you how to prepare your colon for this exam. If you have any problems with your preparation call your physician for additional instructions. Your colon must be completely empty for the colonoscopy to be thorough and safe. The stool should be liquid and clear of solid matter by the time your prep is completed.

Reference: Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates, Colonoscopy brochure and Guide for Patients prepared by National Digestive, Diseases Information Clearing House.

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Phelps Medical Associates

Phelps Medical Associates - Gastroenterology
777 North Broadway, Suite 305
Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591
Tel: 914.366.5420
Fax: 914.366.5421
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